10 of the Easiest Classes at Clarkson University

A lot of college students find it stressful to transition. Especially, if they don’t have an idea of the type of classes they should take. Choosing easier classes alongside difficult core courses can give you the balance you need for dealing with college life. It will also help as a GPA booster and it could be enlightening. Here are 10 of the easiest courses to take at Clarkson University.

1.      CM 121 – Freshmen Seminar

A course to acquaint incoming freshmen with activities and facilities in the Chemistry Department, provide a forum for discussion of curriculum choices and career options in chemistry.

2.      CS 141 – Introduction to Computer Science I

This course is an introduction to basic concepts of computer science, with emphasis on programming. Computer programming is to the study of computer science what writing is to the study of literature. It is a primary tool for implementing algorithms in computer science. Fundamental techniques for software design and implementation will be covered and these concepts demonstrated in a programming language like C++. Additional topics include top-down modular design, developing general-purpose software tools, procedural and data abstraction, algorithms, and an introduction to recursion and dynamic data structures.

3.      DA 140 – Introduction to Digital Art: Form & Code

This course introduces the key principles of computer programming. Through workshops, presentations, quizzes, readings, and project based exercises and assignments, the course embarks on an investigation into the creative possibilities of computer programming within the digital arts. The skills and concepts taught in this course set a foundation for higher level DA&S courses within e.g. game design, web programming, and computational arts.

4.      COMM 217 – Introduction to Public Speaking

This lecture and laboratory course is designed to enhance the individual’s effective public communication by giving him or her a variety of speaking roles in different situations. The objective of the course is to develop an awareness of the speaking potential of each student with emphasis on listening ability, nonverbal behaviour, idea organization and effective use of language and visual aids.

5.      PHIL 200 – Philosophy and Contemporary Issues

This course introduces students to philosophy and philosophizing by using philosophical concepts and methods to examine contemporary issues. For example, a society’s practices regarding crime and punishment rest on its beliefs about human freedom and responsibility, and philosophical discussions of determinism provide a vantage point from which to critically evaluate these beliefs. Other issues — such as the possibility and implications of artificial intelligence, the legitimacy of religious beliefs, the morality of torture, and the paradoxes of democracy (for example, people who are rational managers of their time may not spend the time necessary to be informed citizens) — can be evaluated on the basis of philosophical accounts about knowledge, religion, the basis of morality, and the nature of the state.

6.      PY 310 – Human Sexuality

The course objective is to provide an informed perspective on human sexual behaviour. Topics include anatomy and physiology, contraception, sexually transmitted diseases, sexual development and identity, varieties of sexual behaviour across cultures and species, disorders and difficulties of sexual expression, therapeutic issues on the treatment of sexual disorders and the role of sex in interpersonal relationships.

7.      PY 151 – Introduction to Psychology

Emphasizes the scientific study of the human mind. Appropriate research methods and philosophical questions will be considered. Topics include the brain, memory, perception, development, personality, social behaviour, emotion, motivation, psychological disorders, stress, and states of consciousness.

8.      ANTH 235 – Europe through Film and Fiction

This introductory Anthropology course introduces students to the diversity of European cultures through film and fiction, and through various themes, including love across cultures, post-Cold War transitions, the expansion of the European Union, the growing integration between European states, cultural conflicts, and the rise of anti-immigrant movements and politics in wide swaths of Europe.

9.      DA 140 – Introduction to Digital Art: Form & Code

This course introduces the key principles of computer programming. Through workshops, presentations, quizzes, readings, and project based exercises and assignments, the course embarks on an investigation into the creative possibilities of computer programming within the digital arts. The skills and concepts taught in this course set a foundation for higher level DA&S courses within e.g. game design, web programming, and computational arts.

10.  COMM 101- Introductory Writing

The focus of this type of course is the teaching of writing itself, and typical titles include ‘Freshman Composition,’ ‘Composition 1,’ ‘Expository Writing,’ ‘Freshman English,’ and ‘Writing and Critical Thinking,’ among others.

No Comments Yet

Leave a Reply