Chapman University

Classes can be tough, but they don’t necessarily have to be. Chances are you’ve asked yourself, “What are the easiest courses?” because you want to boost your GPA or you just don’t want to stress. Here is a list of ten easy courses you can take at Chapman University.

1. ASL 101 – Elementary American Sign Language

This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of American Sign Language. The course will prepare students to work within a visual environment and initiate basic visual/gestural communication in ASL. (Offered as needed.) Three credits. Class Notes: Internet and a computer with a microphone and camera are necessary to participate in this online course.

2. AVE 109 – Fundamental Graphics I for Animation and Visual Effects

Prerequisite, animation, and visual effects major. An introduction to graphic imagery fundamentals, including shapes, forms, structure, composition, value, tone, light, and shadow, expressly apply to the world of animation and visual effects. Students are taught to observe, analyze, and understand and apply these essential components of imagery in preparation for work in animation, character development, and production design. Fee: $100. (Offered fall semester.) Three credits. Enrollment Requirements: Prerequisite, Animation, and Visual Effects major, or Digital Arts major.

3. ANTH 102 – Cultural Anthropology

The study of how human civilizations adapt to living situations by forming group identity, families, language, and symbols. The examination of how societies create world views and concepts of progress, culture, community, and social interaction. Students will explore these questions using models from cultures, foreign and familiar. (Offered every semester.).

4. GRK 101 – Elementary Classical Greek I

Mastery of alphabet, vocabulary, grammar, and correct pronunciation, along with introducing classical Greece. (Offered every year.) Three credits. Class Notes: M(1/2), W(1/2), F(1/2): Monday (Group A: 1/2 students Attending in classroom-Group B-1/2 watching classroom webcam from home at regular class time), Wednesday (Group B: 1/2 attending in classroom-Group A 1/2 watching classroom webcam from home at standard class time), Friday (Group A: 1/2 students Attending in classroom-Group B-1/2 watching classroom webcam from home at regular class time), Monday (Group B: 1/2 attending in classroom-Group A 1/2 watching classroom webcam from home at standard class time)…this alternating pattern repeats throughout the semester.

5. HIST 101 – U S History Survey I

A look at all the major themes from 1607 through the Civil War, including establishing a new nation. American literature is given special consideration. Slavery, states rights, religion, and the beginning of the westward movement are emphasized. (Offered every year.).

6. REL 125 – Philosophy of Religion

 An introduction to philosophical issues in the world religions. Comparisons and contrasts between Western and Asian philosophies of religion are emphasized: What is life’s meaning? How do resurrection and reincarnation differ? Does God exist? How could a good God allow evil? Could only one religion be right? (Offered every semester.) Three credits. Class Notes: This class will be taught entirely online. Equipment necessary for participation in the online course: internet access, webcam, microphone, personal computer.

7. REL 115 – Living Religions of the World

A survey of religious traditions of the world includes Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, Sikhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam: basic beliefs and practices, and their relevance to human problems. (Offered every semester.). Class Notes: Class will meet entirely online. Equipment necessary for participation in the online class (such as internet access, webcam, microphone, personal computer).

8. SOC 101 – Introduction to Sociology

An examination of the basic concepts, principles, and findings of sociology: addressing the nature of human social relations from superficial, face-to-face relationships, and through formal organizations and whole societies. Students discover how social patterns are created, how they become organized and established, and how they change. They will also practice and apply sociological concepts to local communities. (Offered every semester.) Three credits. Class Notes: 2 Seats Reserved for Sociology Majors, Transfer Students5 Seats Reserved for Sociology Majors, HS Freshmen.

9. SPAN 101 – Elementary Spanish I

Students develop basic competence in the four skills of listening, speaking, reading, and composition writing. Emphasis is placed on conversational skills pertinent to a variety of social situations in different cultures. The class is conducted in Spanish. (Offered every semester.) Three credits. Class Notes: M(1/2), W(1/2, F (online): Monday (Group A: 1/2 students Attending in classroom-Group B-1/2 watching classroom webcam from home at standard class time), Wednesday (Group B: 1/2 attending in classroom-Group A 1/2 watching classroom webcam from home at standard class time), Friday (Online meeting for both Group A&B at standard class time).

10. TH 100 – Introduction to Theatre Technology

This course is an overview of theatre production. It will introduce the student to production elements ranging from scenery, lighting, audio, projections, costumes, props, and emerging technologies. Emphasis will be placed on the implementation of technical details and production safety. Fee: $150. (Offered every semester.) Three credits. Class Notes: This will be a Hi-flex class: a portion will meet in person, and a part will meet remotely.

Please note that these classes are based on student’s opinion and could vary each year. Be sure to look into the syllabus first. Some of these classes could also be taken as an online course. Usually this is a lot more convenient for students.

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