University of Wisconsin - La Crosse

At one point or another, you may have said, “let me look for easy classes to take” or “why didn’t I take easier classes?” well, you are at the right place if you are looking for easy classes to take at the University of Wisconsin – La Crosse. These are 10 of the easiest classes.

1. ANT 101 – Human Nature/Human Culture

This course provides an overview of anthropology’s four subfields: physical anthropology, archaeology, cultural anthropology, and linguistic anthropology. The course will focus on how anthropologists seek to understand what it means to be human by examining how people are biologically, culturally, and socially similar and different worldwide. We will cover multiple aspects of the human experience, including human evolution and biological diversity, primates and hominids, domestication and subsistence practices, marriage systems, sex and gender norms, religious beliefs, and linguistic diversity.

2. ARA 101 – Elementary Arabic I

This course will acquaint students with the working vocabulary, dialogue skills, and pronunciation needed for elementary Arabic reading and writing. Linguistic development will include basic listening skills, elementary conversation, appreciation of Arabic dialects, and knowledge of Arab culture. Class Notes: This is a hybrid course. It meets face to face T/H and online M/W. Students may be required to purchase an additional workbook costing $44.00 or more. Distance Education (receive site). Students enrolled in this class should not schedule other activities during this class time. The instructor will inform students at the beginning of the semester which days attendance is required or encouraged.

3. ART 102 – Art Appreciation

Discovering the visual world. An introduction to the visual arts of applied arts, architecture, craft arts, film/video arts, painting/drawing, printing/ graphic arts, and sculpture. The student will learn to use analysis and evaluation to explore the meaning of art. Class Notes: Students enrolled in this class should not schedule other activities during this class time. The instructor will inform students at the beginning of the semester which days attendance is required and encouraged.

4. ECE 213 – Introduction to Early Childhood Education

An introduction to the early childhood education profession and programs that provide care and education for young children (birth through age eight) and their families. The course will examine historical and theoretical influences on early childhood programs, the roles and responsibilities of early childhood professionals, and the effects of early childhood education on children’s development and learning. An overview of developmentally appropriate practice will focus on the teacher as a decision-maker, multiple sources of knowledge that inform practice, designing positive learning environments, and collaborative relationships with families and colleagues. The course includes a field experience with young children in early childhood programs. Class Notes: Criminal background check required; students are responsible for initiating criminal background checks online and all associated fees. Undergraduate students might be needed to purchase new textbooks and other materials from the University Bookstore. The textbook list will indicate when a purchase is required. Students enrolled in this class should not schedule other activities during this class time. The instructor will inform students at the beginning of the semester which days attendance is required and encouraged.

5. ENV 201 – Introduction to Environmental Studies

An interdisciplinary, introductory seminar will explore current environmental issues from various perspectives (scientific, historical, and social) and disciplines (natural sciences, social sciences, and humanities). Attitudes toward the natural world and approaches to public and private decision-making will also be examined. Some field trips will be used to examine local and regional practices and issues. Class Notes: Students enrolled in this class should not schedule other activities during this class time. The instructor will inform students at the beginning of the semester which days attendance is required and encouraged.

6. GEO 102 – Maps and Society

This course introduces all aspects of maps and how they affect the individual in society. It examines the evolution of maps, the map as an art form, the map as a communication medium for spatial knowledge, the meaning of maps and their relationship to culture and society past and present, the influence of maps on an individual through mass media and the Internet, and the way maps reflect personal and societal points of view. It focuses on privacy and civil liberty issues of the individual in the age of digital information where maps and map databases can disclose personal space privacy. Besides, today’s GIS maps (in planning, in marketing, in hazard controls, etc.) embed substantial amounts of personal information that can affect personal security and how our lives are directly, indirectly, knowingly, and unknowingly influenced.

7. HIS 110 – World History

This course examines world history using a specific theme. The course is global in scope from ancient times to the present and covers a minimum of three civilizations. Instructors trace the development of one theme over multiple historical periods and places in the world. Class Notes: Students enrolled in this class should not schedule other activities during this class time. The instructor will inform students at the beginning of the semester which days attendance is required and encouraged.

8. JPN 101 – Elementary Japanese I

This is the first of two introductory courses in Japanese for students with no prior knowledge of this language, focused on developing the four communicative skills: listening, speaking, writing, and reading, with an introduction to Japanese culture through a variety of topics from everyday life (family, shopping) to the arts (cinema, literature). A year of high school study in this language is equivalent to the 101 level. Class Notes: MW is a live online class. We will meet during regular class time via Blackboard collaborate ultra (desktop video conferencing tool) instead of meeting face-to-face in a brick & Mortar classroom. Students may be required to purchase an additional workbook costing $30.00 or more. Distance Education (receive site). Students enrolled in this class should not schedule other activities during this class time. The instructor will inform students at the beginning of the semester which days attendance is required and encouraged

9. MUS 105 – Music Appreciation

The Western classical tradition. A survey of the forms and styles within each period since the Baroque. Emphasis on the content of specific masterpieces to enhance perceptive learning. Not applicable to major or minor. Enrollment Requirements: Not open to students with credit in MUS 110.

10. PHL 100 – Introduction to Philosophy

Are you looking for answers to life’s essential questions? This course offers the student an introduction to major philosophical topics such as reality, personal identity, freedom, knowledge, morality, religion, and social justice.

Please note that these classes are based on student’s opinion and could vary each year. Be sure to look into the syllabus first. Some of these classes could also be taken as an online course. Usually this is a lot more convenient for students.

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